The current Farm bill represents a new low in US politics. What used to be a fairly shared value - feeding the hungry - is now out the window. Previous arguments for cutting food programs focused on fraud and waste. Now, proponents of cuts do not deny that there is need or hunger. They are asserting, successfully, that there are people who don't deserve food even if they are hungry.

The biggest food fight of all is ensuring that SNAP remains in place to feed people, especially during this time of extended economic downturn. There is a massive right wing attack on people’s basic rights, one of the most important being the right to food.

The fight for improving school food in communities inundated with processed food continues as communities, parents, and students work to find creative ways to challenge the corporate-dominated school food contract system. While the USDA has been slowly working to implement better standards for school food, groups are working at the school and school district level to shift cafeteria menus, change contract procurement terms, and source food locally.

Communities are not just fighting hunger, but also fighting for sources of healthy food in their neighborhoods. Growing food in our communities that is healthy, affordable, and GMO-free is a critical part of any food justice movement. Here are some groups that are taking food production to another level by feeding their communities, reviving tradition, and generating wealth.

South West Organizing Project (SWOP) “Project Feed the Hood”

USDA Public Comment Period on Rules for SNAP Retail Establishments Ends Next Month

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Praxis has been reflecting on policing of late - its basic paradigm of "us vs them"; the deep level of dehumanization that takes place in the way officers are trained and socialized, and in how they are trained to perceive those around them that they are paid to protect and serve. If police were actually trained and deployed as if they were to protect and serve, life would be very different for so many of us. So many more of our children would be alive today. So many more mothers and fathers would never know the horror of losing a child.

President Johnson’s historic State of the Union address 50 years ago declared war on poverty and unemployment thanks largely to a large and vibrant grassroots movement. The focus then was on civil rights and ensuring that every “citizen” had the opportunity to make a living and live their life in civil liberty. Today, even these civil rights are under attack and basic human rights such as food are not guaranteed. In fact, as we reflect on this 50th year anniversary of the “War on Poverty,” it is clear that public policy has devolved into a “War on the Poor.”

This week marked the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s "War on Poverty."  Today, it seems as if the war is no longer on poverty—public policy has devolved into a war on the poor.  With catastrophic cuts being proposed to SNAP and other food support, it is important to reflect on an era when the eradication of hunger was on the political agenda and poverty was treated with more compassion and less condemnation. Below are some powerful quotes from a diverse set of leaders that remind us that food justice is a critical part of social justice. 

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